Auction Buzz: Hot on the auction block
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Auction Buzz: Hot on the auction block

Auction Buzz: Hot on the auction block

Affluent private collectors these days are buying the best of the things at best of the prices at the worldwide auctions. And, considering this widespread craze among the collectors and to cash on the demand, the world’s acclaimed auction houses also comes up with rare items which have been popular though, but rarely turns up at the auction blocks. For which, they have been very successful, as it becomes apparent from the recent auction of some of the rare and vintage items like the “Star Trek” shuttlecraft prop, Mahatma Gandhi’s letters, George Washington’s personal constitution for $3 million, Apple 1 computer for $374,500, the Japanese Iron mask that sells for thirty times its original price, and the Norwegian expressionist artist Edvard Munch's painting "The Scream" bought by New York financier Leon Black for whopping $120 million. Every now and then, some of the other historic and valuable item come under the hammer and gets sold for a price to talk about. Here, we have again come up with some of the items that were hot on the auction blocks worldwide.

Auction Buzz: Hot on the auction block

Willem van de Velde the Younger’s 17th-century painting

Sold for: $8.18 million

Willem van de Velde the Younger’s 17th-century painting

An acclaimed Dutch marine painter Willem van de Velde the Younger’s 17th century painting of the surrender of a British flagship to a Dutch fleet back in year 1666, which was estimated at $2.3 million to $3.8 million got sold for an astounding price of $8.18 million. Interestingly, this painting hadn’t been seen at any of the auctions for more than 30 years. At the Sotheby’s July 4 auction of Old Master paintings in London, the painting was won by a Dutch collector after a nine-minute battle.

Jane Austen’s turquoise ring

Sold for: $236,557

Jane Austen’s turquoise ring

A turquoise ring once belonging to Jane Austen, an acclaimed English novelist whose work of romantic fiction earned her the place as the widely read writers in English literature, got sold at Sotheby’s auction for $236,557, more than five times its pre-sale estimate. The Pride and Prejudice writer’s modest ring, which featured a large oval turquoise gemstone, is described to be wonderfully intimate and an evocative possession. The generated interest and the handsome price achieved is a true testament to the classic author’s enduring appeal. The winning bidder was an anonymous private collector who made his offer over the phone. Interestingly, Jane Austen’s earliest surviving manuscript, a hand-written draft of a book that was never published, got sold for $1.6 million at the Sotheby’s auction.

Ty Cobb Bat

Sold for: $220,000

Ty Cobb Bat

In the last year of his playing career, Tyrus Raymond “Ty” Cobb, also nicknamed ‘The Georgia Peach’ gave a tobacco-juice and pitch stained bat he had used to a then 19-year player named Eddie Onslow, who had joined the Detroit Tigers in 1912. Now, almost 100 years later, that historic bat has been sold at the Fan Fest aution in Kansas City for a record $220,000. The bat had remained in Onslow’s family for four generations.

Lou Gehrig home run ball from 1928 World Series

Sold for: $62,617

Lou Gehrig home run ball from 1928 World Series

The 84-year old baseball, which the New York Yankees slugger Lou Gehrig hit for a home run in the 1928 World Series, and was in the Elizabeth’s Gott’s drawer for several years, has now been auctioned for $62,617 by the Hunt Auctions. Elizabeth Gott actually decided to sell the historic ball on behalf of her 30-year old son, Michael, so he could use the proceeds to pay-off his medical school debt. Historically, Gehrig hit the homer-off St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Grover Celeland Alexander while teammate, the iconic Babe Ruth was on base.

Faberge Box

Sold for: $70,000

Faberge Box by Henrik Wigstrom

A late imperial period Faberge box made from panels of lapis lazuli and produced by Henrik Wigstrom, a Faberge workmaster in St. Petersberg, got sold for $70,000, almost 338% more than pre-sale estimate. In an international bidding, a buyer in London won over a buyer in New York.

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