The Glenlivet 70 Year Old: World’s oldest single malt whisky goes on auction
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The Glenlivet 70 Year Old: World’s oldest single malt whisky goes on auction

The Glenlivet 70 Year Old: World’s oldest single malt whisky goes on auction

The Glenlivet 70 year old whiskey

Glenlivet’s name has traditionally been on the list of famous whiskey connoisseurs since the 18th century, when it was initially made available for sale. Under the aegis of Gordon and MacPhail’s ‘Generations’ label, Glenlivet has been known for some of the most uniquely flavored malt whiskey’s the world over. At the FNB Whiskey Live Festival 2011 in South Africa, 2 bottles of the 1940 Glenlivet will go on auction, to raise funds for the Foundation of Alcohol Related Research (FARR).

Left for maturation during the heights of the Battle of Britain, the whiskey was first aged in a First Shill Sherry Butt, before being transferred into bottles. The rare amber color of the beverage, along with multi-layered rich aromas of old cocktail cabinet’s wood, fine leather, fruits, and even a shade of wax, these bottles have more than just whiskey in them; they have works of art, rather. Their container, the tear shaped glass decanter with silver top which British Hallmarked, further adds to the exclusivity of the bottle. The decanters have been handcrafted by blowing up the glass into the unique shape, before fitting on the silver cap.

Other than this particular whiskey, we had earlier shown you some previous editions such as:

· 70 year-old Speyside Mortlach

Mortlach 70 years whiskey

This is actually a ‘sister’ malt whiskey of the Glenlivet, which has been retailed at over $15,000 a bottle. The Mortlach was left for aging 2 years before the Glenlivet, and in 2008 was allowed to be taken out from the casks, and then bottled only to be later unveiled and tasted by a select group of whiskey connoisseurs in Edinburgh, Scotland.

· 1883 Glenlivet

1883 Glenlivet whiskey

This whiskey is largely known as the world’s oldest whiskey, and went on auction on the 12th October, 2011. The winning bid for it was $29,530. Distilled in 1883, it was bottled in 1931 by George & John Gordon Smith. Initially sold for prices as high as $30,740, the bottle has changed many hands including Captain William Smith, who happened to be the great grandson of Colonel George Smith, the founder of the Glenlivet distillery.

Via: Bloomberg

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