Kurt Kohlstedt – Cool Geek of the Week
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Kurt Kohlstedt – Cool Geek of the Week

Kurt Kohlstedt – Cool Geek of the Week
kurtWe are back in time with Kurt’s answers, so sit back and enjoy the witty answers from this creative entrepreneur who bootstrapped his mini but awesome network of sites including The WebUrbanist, focusing on urban culture. Kurt breaks the blogging myth of updating your blog multiple times in a day successfully, so check out what tips this ProBlogger has for all of the budding bloggers. 1). Gina: What motivated you to start blogging? Was it originally a hobby or a well thought out move to earn a living off blogging? Kurt: It was initially as much a happy accident as anything. I happened to buy a domain, a friend happened to install WordPress and I happened to become fascinated with the (to me new) concept of blogging. As I worked on finishing my graduate degree in architecture, I slowly began to realize that I was equally (if not more) interested in writing about design as becoming an architectural design professional. It was at that point I decided to give full-time online publishing a shot. 2). Andy: Did you ever have to promote your blog to get some initial traction? Kurt: best place to buy valtrex online, valacyclovir for cold sores best dose - rockgateco I did various things to attract attention at the start and to build the critical mass of readers that would eventually become the core supporters of WebUrbanist – including engaging in discussions in social forums, networking with other publishers and so forth. However, at some point the tables turned – so many people became so interested in the site that they began requesting to be informed when articles were going to be published so they could be the first to submit them to forums, social media sites and so forth. That was, to say the least, very encouraging. 3). Alex: What efforts did the whole team at Webist Media put in to market the ideas published across all blogs? Kurt: At this point we do fairly little in terms of active promotion. We do exchange links and reader exposure with a select set of like-minded publishers. Sometimes site editors and writers also submit content to social sites or repost links in their social profiles, but mainly the traffic is regular readers at this point – followed by largely unsolicited referral traffic from other high-profile publications. 4). Vikas: Is Twitter the CNN of the new media generation? How much contribution has Twitter played in your a million readership? Kurt: To me, Twitter itself is nothing entirely new – though the scale of it naturally is. People have been micro-blogging in various formats for years now, but I must admit: Twitter is different insofar as it does provide an amazing real-time look at what is being discussed online, even if the noise-to-signal ratio remains way out of control. However, that said, some of our most loyal readers have found us and help promote us through Twitter and I consider the relatively small percentage of visitors that come regularly to the site from Twitter to be some of the most engaged ones. Also, Twitter is a great place to start conversations with readers, solicit feedback and ask for their input and ideas – far better than, for example, blog comments ever were. 5). Neil: Kurt, please share the creative process that goes into framing the awesome articles on your blogs. What are your innovation rituals? Kurt: It all starts with an example or an instance – an amazing artist, designer, work of art or piece of design. Then comes the search for more like that. It sounds simple but is often non-linear – what starts as an idea for a certain kind of article can transform by the time it is finished. Sometimes I set out to write about one thing but my research takes me in an entirely different direction. After the fact, I look at the reader response to the article and, if it is well-received, I try to ask myself: why? Sometimes a series or an entirely new category of content results from a successful article, either written by myself or one of my amazing all-star authors. 6). Larry: Kurt, do you think that the new urbanist developments are truly sustainable? Kurt: Ah, New Urbanism … in the limelight as always. I think the theory is sound, but in practice it often becomes kitsch – a kind of idealization of walkable towns and city centers gone by. Perhaps, as with fashion and other trends, we will wind our way back to that sort of built environment eventually, but for now I believe that alternative fuel sources, new modes of transportation and other forms of innovation are likely to take us in entirely different directions by and large. best buy drugs: for muscle spasticity— generic baclofen . if baclofen causes intolerable side effects, we recom- mend generic tizanidine. we do not recommend 7). Jason: Kurt, how did you come up with your “One post a day, five authors, one lead editor” strategy behind WebUrbanist's success? Also, don’t you ever feel the need of serving more fodder to your readers just like all the other prominent blogs in and outside your niche do? methotrexate online Kurt: I read a fairly profound article some time back which lobbied heavily for writing less, not more, to grab the attention of blog readers. The core argument, distilled, amounted to: with ever-more content on the web people must pick and choose – quality will beat quantity in the end. That is one half of the equation. The other half is my own background in writing. Prior to writing on the web, most of my written work was academic in nature – research papers, analysis, synthesis, and if ever I had trouble with length or word-count requirements it was that I was hitting the maximum, not unable to reach the minimum. In short: I am long-winded by nature in print as well as in person, so longer and more thorough articles also came more naturally to me overall. I have, however, also found there to be limitations to this strictly-enforced format, which ties back into the second part of your question. WebUrbanist and WebEcoist were built around this format and the readers have come to expect and appreciate it. However, to satisfy my own insatiable taste for writing I also started Dornob, followed by Gajitz to sooth my inner geek. These sites – while they still follow the ‘sensational, educational and inspirational’ motto of WebUrbanist and WebEcoist, do feature multiple articles a day, though the quality is still strictly controlled – nothing is ever published simply to fill space. While there is something deeply satisfying about writing up everything you can find on a given topic (i.e. on the Webist sites) there is also something equally compelling about slowly compiling a vast and easy-to-navigate archive of compelling single-topic studies on individual artists, designers and innovators and/or works of art, design and innovation. 8). Team: Describe your typical day at work. Do you ever face writer’s block? If yes, what do you do to overcome from it? Kurt: I hate to say it, but at this point – with four sites to manage – I spend a good deal of time answering emails and putting out fires related to technology, design, advertising and editing responsibilities. When I do secure time to write it is a zen-like escape from the other tasks that always seem to pile up around me. While I am too, well, talkative/writeative (the latter is not a word but should be!) to ever really run out of things to type I do sometimes find myself burning out a bit from simply writing too much on top of everything else. What I try to do is work ahead when possible so that if I cannot find the mental energy to write I am at least sufficiently ahead of the game to take a break for a bit. 9). Team: Tell us about five of your must-read blogs. Kurt: Neatorama, DarkRoastedBlend and Mental_Floss, Burbia LifeintheFastLane.ca are all wonderful resources for all kinds of weird, wacky and wild things – not to mention that they are all run by amazing, talented and dedicated people. I gravitate as much toward the voice and/or founders of a site as I do to the content. That said, however, I am most drawn to both site and founder when they express a fascination with the strange and sensational things of (or beyond) our world. 10). Team: Your views on BornRich and Instablogs? I really appreciate the format and approach you take, not to mention the amazing cast of people I am personally in awe of who you have managed to interview before me – I am extremely pleased to be counted in their company as well. Like my other favourite sites mentioned above, I am a big fan of the clearly intense personal interest you bring to the page in the things you write about. RAPIDFIRE ROUND:- 1). Your take on weblogs award: a. they suck b. they rule? Kurt: (a) Most blog awards seem out of touch with what is actually cool 2). Do you feel there the blogosphere is biased towards fewer popular blogs than others? Kurt: In a way, sure … a lot of talented people get very little traction. They need to learn how to be seen. 3). Your favorite blogger other than from your team? Kurt: Ouch, that’s such a tough one … maybe Alex of Lasix online Neatorama, for publishing so darned much stuff. 4). Your favorite list idea from WebUrbanist so far? Kurt: The advair diskus generic brand advair diskus 250 50 price comparison buy Flonase 7 Abandoned Wonders order Premarin online article spawned an entire (and the most popular ever) series on the site. 5). What gadgets do you carry with you always? Kurt: A wallet chain is my main add-on – practical and simple security when in unfamiliar urban terrain. 6). Any online store on cards for any of your blogs in future? Kurt: Maybe, we will see – I would like to poll my readers first and get their reactions. 7). Bing or Google? Kurt: Despite being in ‘new media’ I like to stick with what I know works – Google until proven otherwise. 8). Most adventurous thing you have done: a. bungee jumping b. starting WebUrbanist c. mountain climbing d. got married e. Other? Kurt: Aside from breaking my neck: starting WebUrbanist – friends and family thought I was insane. 9). Top reasons why you lose your cool a. Bad Drivers, b. Splogs, c. Blogs stealing your posts without giving you credit, d. Telemarketers e. Answering Bornich Rapid Fire Questions? Kurt: Hah, naw, I’ve gotten over a, b, c, d and e – I lose it now when my ideas outpace my abilities/time. 10). If god grants you just one wish, what would you ask for ? Kurt: Someone to take my place and run the business so I could stick to what I do best: the creative side. 11). What’s your future plan for your mini network a. Getting acquired b. Raise funding? Kurt: Probably neither. If things get too big to manage I might do one or the other, but for now boot-strapping has gotten the sites this far and the load is still manageable (well, at 80 hours/week). If I were to sell, I would almost certainly not sell all of the sites but rather a select few – I have no interest in changing my line of work entirely or retiring young at this point. 12). Twitter or Facebook? Kurt: Twitter – simple, profound, like Google. Facebook is too big, bulky, complex for my tastes. 13). Do you secretly follow any tips for a bigger fan following on Twitter? Kurt: Nothing extraordinary – no hacks or cheats or whatnot, I just follow folks, interact with others, share and share alike. Besides, despite my preference for Twitter over Facebook I still think the real value of the site comes in the quality of core friends and followers, not in the quantity. We wish Kurt and his entire team at Webist Media “Best of Luck” in all their future endeavors! jan 1, 2015 - discrete cialis buy fluoxetine 20mg , buy elavil online order doxycycline.
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