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Meteorite Dar al Gani (DaG) 1058 the fourth largest piece of Moon is up for grabs at $380,000

Andrea Divirgilio / September 17, 2012

Peerless for exhibition purposes, the fourth largest chunk of the moon available to private collectors, the meteorite piece, known as Dar al Gani (DAG) 1058, which is described to be worthy of the most important natural history museums in the world is now up for grabs. Shaped like a large slab, the DaG 1058 which is defined to have the single largest surface area to mass ratio of any of the largest lunar meteorites, will be sold as part of the Heritage Auctions’ Natural History Signature Meteorite Auction scheduled to be held in New York on 14th October. Notably, scientists have determined that Dar al Gani 1058 is a lunar highland breccia from the Moon’s far side. However, we have also earlier seen the sale of the world’s most famous meteorites, the meteorite Valley of the Sky which was sold for $93K, and the piece of rock fell from Mars, besides the offering of rare Tissint meteorite from the Mars that landed in an African desert last year.

Meteorite Dar al Gani (DaG) 1058 the fourth largest piece of Moon is up for grabs at $380,000

Meteorite Dar al Gani (DaG) 1058 the fourth largest piece of Moon is up for grabs at $380,000

Interestingly, as per the reports the DaG 1058 was repeatedly smashed by numerous number of asteroids prior to its departure from the moon’s surface. Described to be a ‘lunar breccia’, it is composed of various mineral and rock fragments.

Meteorite Dar al Gani (DaG) 1058 the fourth largest piece of Moon is up for grabs at $380,000

Lunar specimens which are identified by mineralogical, chemical, geological, and radiation signatures, along with an analysis of the radiation level that identifies this specimen’s origin as far side of moon, are described in the scientific abstract that will accompany this lot. Notably, Dr Anthony Irving of the University of Washington, who is renowned for the classification of lunar meteorites, was the lead author on the work done on DaG 1058.

Meteorite Dar al Gani (DaG) 1058 the fourth largest piece of Moon is up for grabs at $380,000

The DaG 1058 is also paired to the first lunar meteorite recognized to have fallen in Africa, the DaG 400. It’s believed that both of these lunar meteorites have originated from the same event, as they were found in proximity to one another.

Offered by an anonymous collector, the Dar al Gani 1058 is expected to sell at an estimated price of $340,000 to $380,000.

Also, it should be noted that moon rock recoveries by Apollo Mission astronauts will never appear come at the auction blocks.

UPDATE: The 1.8 kg of Moon rock has been sold for $330,000, $10,000 less than its pre-sale estimate.

Via: HeritageAuctions

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