Three rarest Islamic gold coins at Morton & Eden auction
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Three rarest Islamic gold coins at Morton & Eden auction

Three rarest Islamic gold coins at Morton & Eden auction

Though centuries old but they still create a mystic glimmer amongst numismatics, who study them in great depth. It's no wonder that their study has given rise to a new school of art of coin collection, much of which is cherished as noticed at coin auctions. So much has been the value of these historical objects of legal tender, that some of them have managed to fetch millions at auction events like we saw in the most expensive coins. Now, noted coin auction house Morton & Eden will be selling 2 coins, which are jointly expected to fetch in excess of $532,787 (£350,000) at the upcoming event, Important Coins of the Islamic world. These symbols of the yesteryear currencies are noted to be dating back to the time, which included the decades after the death of the Holy Prophet Mohammed (S.A.W), which had large areas of the Byzantyne Empire taken over by the Muslims.

Islamic gold coins on auction

When matched closely enough, these coins resemble the Byzantine Solidi by and large, but the Christian symbols are known to have been removed from them. During the decades of conquests back then, the volume of the Solidis begun to fall short of requirement for everyday use, hence the Islamic conquerors had to bring in more such dyed coins. Hence, during the process of minting new coins, they removed some of the christian symbols like the large crosses replaced by a 'T-shape' at top, and smaller crosses were removed as well. Though there have been debates amongst scholars, but these gold coins could well be the first gold coins minted by the Muslim empire.

The Ummayad Dinar

The interest in Islamic legal tender isn't just a modern phenomenon. In 2011, a Umayyad Dinar sold at a record price of $6.029 million, thus making it the 2nd most expensive coins ever sold at auction. It is said that these coins were minted during the time when the gold used in the coins were taken from a mine owned by the Caliph, who had led a Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca. Also the inscriptions on the coin made it one of the earliest to mention a location now traced in modern day Saudi Arabia. The expected price for the coin was expected to be 15 times lower, but 4 aggressive bidders at the event put the prices higher.

Via: Art Daily

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