Van Dyck portrait set to fetch 1,000 times original price
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Van Dyck portrait set to fetch 1,000 times original price

Van Dyck portrait set to fetch 1,000 times original price
An authentic Van Dyck painting which was apparently lost in mysterious circumstances is expected to fetch a whopping amount at a sale organized by the renowned auction house of Christie's. The ancient portrait tagged with the original price tag of around $685, 500 is reportedly going under the hammer for nearly $850,000. Interestingly the work of art was spotted on a British television program several years after its abrupt disappearance. The iconic painting dates way back to 1635 and isa a sketch of the subject "The Magistrates Of Brussels,". It was previously bought by a Catholic priest Father Jamie MacLeod from an old antiques shop located in Cheshire, northern England. However after many years the portrait was featured for the taping of the BBC show "Antiques Roadshow." At that time the host of the show Fiona Bruce was working on a show depicting the achievements of the famous Flemish artist Anthony Van Dyck.  Interestingly Fiona brought the same painting under the notice of an expert believing it to be a genuine one. MacLeod later admitted to the media that he was really honoured to own this magnificent painting for such a long time. The funds which would be collected following the auctioning of the portrait will be used to buy new church bells for a retreat MacLeod runs in Derbyshire, northern England. The auction house reportedly provided a pre-estimate price of between £300,000 and £500,000 for the artwork, a figure which was apparently overlooked by the Van Dyck scholars as the sketch had largely been obscured by overpainting. As per reports this masterpiece was thoroughly cleaned, restored and checked by Christopher Brown, considered to be one of the world's foremost authorities on Van Dyck, who pronounced it as a genuine art work. The auction house later remarked that the particular painting is an important specimen since it constitutes the various details which provide a fascinating insight into the artist's working method. The painting even constitutes an important surviving document for the lost group portrait of “The Magistrates of Brussels”.
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