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The weather-proof AM-1 is the most durable loudspeaker Bowers & Wilkins has ever made

Andrea Divirgilio / February 12, 2013

Designed to deliver great sound wherever you need it and under all weather conditions, be it the venues such as bars, outdoor pools, restaurants and other communal areas, here’s the articulate, exciting and powerful AM-1 Architectural Monitor, the most durable loudspeaker ever created by the noted British manufacturer of mid-range through reference quality hi-fi and home theater speakers, Bowers & Wilkins, which earlier impressed the audio world with the geeky and sexy optimal resonance speakers, the PM1 speakers, the Signature Diamond speakers and Zeppelin. Offering a unique combination of high-quality sound and supreme flexibility, the weather-proof AM-1 impressively avoids all sorts of compromises commonly associated with all-weather monitors, and original Bowers & Wilkins performance.

The weather-proof AM-1 is the most durable loudspeaker Bowers & Wilkins has ever made

The weather-proof AM-1 is the most durable loudspeaker Bowers & Wilkins has ever made

With an impressive two-way design, the AM-1 features an inverted drive unit configuration, which ensures sounds optimal dispersion when the speaker is mounted high on a wall. Further, a rear-mounted auxiliary bass radiator (ABR) not only provides the low-end range bass but serves also to protect against the elements.

The weather-proof AM-1 is the most durable loudspeaker Bowers & Wilkins has ever made

Available in black and white, the extra flexible and easy install-able AM-1 has been designed to be positioned in either portrait or landscape mode, and comes with the ability to be rotated through 110-degrees from centre in both directions.

The weather-proof AM-1 is the most durable loudspeaker Bowers & Wilkins has ever made

It also impressively combines a rust-proof aluminum grille with a rigid cabinet composed of glass-filled plastics, which ensures class-leading resistance to extremes of moisture, UV exposure, and dust elements.

Via: Bowers-Wilkins

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