WW2 toy plane fetches £10,000 at auction to become the most expensive toy air plane
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WW2 toy plane fetches £10,000 at auction to become the most expensive toy air plane

WW2 toy plane fetches £10,000 at auction to become the most expensive toy air plane

The 5th most heavily bombed British city of WW II, Bristol became the top bombing target by the Nazi German Luftwaffe because of the presence of Bristol Harbour and the Bristol Aeroplane Company. And, during that bombing back in 1941 one innocent youngster who was gifted a ‘tin monoplane’ died without been able to play with it. Now, that very same toy aeroplane which was originally meant to be a treasured wartime gift, but when Blitz claimed its young owner it remained completely untouched for almost 7 decades in a loft, has been sold for a handsome price of $15,969 at an auction in the United Kingdom. This 70 years old tin monoplane was recently found wrapped in an old newspaper which also features a story about how the city of Bristol had been bombed heavily two nights before it was hit by the Blitz for the 1st time.

WW2 toy plane fetches £10,000 at auction to become the most expensive toy air plane

WW2 toy plane fetches £10,000 at auction to become the most expensive toy air plane

The camouflaged monoplane is originally one of only 3 made by British toy manufacturer W. Britain, which pioneered the use of lead-casting toy soldiers.

WW2 toy plane fetches £10,000 at auction to become the most expensive toy air plane

The manufacturer began producing camouflaged-painted toys after WW II broke, but later switched their manufacturing tools to help the war effort.

WW2 toy plane fetches £10,000 at auction to become the most expensive toy air plane

Still packaged in its original box, the mint condition toy which was originally bought for 9s 6d from Gyles Brothers of Bristol, was bought by an American collector.

WW II German Enigma enciphering machine

Speaking about the WW II memorabilia, also on Bonhams sale is the WW II German Enigma enciphering machine (pictured above) built by Heimsoeth and Rinke in 1941, which was originally intended for commercial purposes, but was later appropriated for German military use.

UPDATE: The extremely rare 1941 WWII German Enigma machine that was used to send coded German messages in WWII sells at Bonhams for £85,250 inc. premium.

Besides, we have also seen the sale offering of World War II's Battle of Britain "The Hurricane" fighter aircraft which is expected to fetch $2.72 million, and the historic WW II Enigma encoding machine.

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